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Jaroslaw Adamowski

Expert Opinion

26th February 2016, Poland

Poland’s Textile Research Institute develops new anti-UV, electromagnetic textiles

Poland’s Textile Research Institute (TRI) has developed new textiles enabled with anti-UV and anti-electromagnetic capacities. Protective clothing developed with the use of these textiles will be supplied to law enforcement officers, healthcare workers, farmers and other professions, but they will also be used in the manufacturing of curtains and other products.

Following research and development activities, the TRI is currently pursuing projects which aim to introduce its products to both the domestic and foreign markets, according to the institute’s management.

Poland’s Textile Research Institute (TRI) has developed new textiles enabled with anti-UV and anti-electromagnetic capacities. © TRI

The R&D works are carried out as part of the Envirotex consortium, led by the Polish institute, which has secured more than PLN 16.5 million (€3.8 million) in funding under the European Union’s Innovative Economy operational programme. As much as 85% of the total amount was provided by the EU, with the remaining part covered by the Polish state.

Foreign, domestic firms eye textile production

To date, the TRI has sold licences for use of these innovative textiles in the manufacturing process to two companies, and numerous foreign producers have applied to obtain further licences, reports local business daily Puls Biznesu. This said, the institute does not grant exclusive rights to distribute its products, which include nano-textiles, worldwide, according to senior TRI representatives.

"There has been a major interest in our products by various companies, also those foreign-based, for instance, from Brazil," said Jadwiga Sójka-Ledakowicz, the institute’s director. "To date, we have granted licences [to commercialise our products] to two companies."

In addition to protective textiles, which are enabled with anti-UV and can be used to manufacture a wide range of special clothing for various professions, other innovative solutions developed by the TRI include protective textile screens fitted with anti-electromagnetic capabilities. According to Sójka-Ledakowicz, these products can be used to protect healthcare professionals and patients from the adverse effects of medical devices. In addition to this, the screens are enabled to block the electromagnetic field emitted by electrical energy lines and radio communication equipment. As works on launching production of such protective textile screens are advancing, the institute has been contacted by a Łódź-based hospital, which is interested in acquiring such products.

Following research and development activities, the TRI is currently pursuing projects which aim to introduce its products to both the domestic and foreign markets, according to the institute’s management. © TRI

Other projects undertaken by the Polish consortium comprise developing new textile structures, including woven and knitted fabrics, fitted with camouflage properties in visible (VIS) and near infra-red (IR) radiation bands.

"The main aim of our works is to commercialise our products. Science matters when its findings can be applied," the institute’s director said.

Camouflage capacities

In addition to the TRI, the Envirotex consortium consists of six other participants. These include two research institutes from the Poznan Technical University and Wroclaw Technical University, as well as the MORATEX Institute of Security Technologies, an R&D entity overseen by the Polish Ministry of Interior and Administration.

MORATEX is chiefly involved in the development of multi-component textile structures fitted with camouflage properties for law enforcement and military professionals. In a paper released by its research staff, the institute says that its R&D works developed as part of the Envirotex consortium allowed it to make new woven and knitted fabrics featuring camouflage properties in the visible (VIS), near infrared (IR) bands, and anti-radar capacities.

Established in 1945, the TRI is based in Łódź, in Poland’s central region of Łódzkie. The city has long played the role of the heartland of Poland’s textile industry. This said, the country’s transformation into a market economy and the fall of Communism in 1989 has forced numerous local textile manufacturers to shut down their operations as a result of an increased competition from more price-competitive foreign producers.

Protective clothing developed with the use of new anti-UV, electromagnetic textiles will be supplied to law enforcement officers, healthcare workers, farmers and other professions. © TRI

Over the past years, Poland’s authorities have intensified efforts to rebuild Łódź’s textile industry and foster innovation in the sector with the use of funds obtained both from the European Union and the state budget. Last year, the Polish government announced plans to invest some PLN 400 million (€93 million) to fund research and development activities by Łódz-based textile producers.

The TRI says that its fields of research comprise new textile materials and technologies, application of biotechnological processes in textile engineering, research on textiles resistant to physical and biological factors such as UV and microorganisms, micro- and nanotechnology including bioactive materials, as well as new directions of research on polymer processing and modifications.

The Polish institute is also the leading force behind the Nanomitex project, a consortium which was formed by Polish research institutes and universities to cooperate on a project to introduce and commercialise nano- and micro textile materials for the production of innovative textiles. Under the plan, the textiles will be enabled with various additional capacities, such as thermo-regulation, bioactive and photocatalytic capacities, allow them to regulate temperature, eliminate pollution, and protect against fire.

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Comments

  • JSL 24th March 2016 9:34AM

    Dear Sirs Mr Sangappa Shillin Mr Subhasish Bandyopadhyay Thank you for your responses; could you please contact Textile Research Institute (IW) - e-mail address: [email protected]

  • sangappa shillin 29th February 2016 3:55AM

    Type your comment hereI Sangappa N Shillin from India congratulates Poland's Textile Research Institute for developing smart textiles. Presently I am working in the field of silk, nano, finishing etc. If you are interested our institute under Ministry of Textiles, Govt of India shall be discussed and shall contribute in your effort. If so contact over my mail [email protected]

  • SUBHASISH BANDYOPADHYAY 27th February 2016 9:51AM

    I as Textile Professional from India appreciate Poland's Textile Research Institute for developing such products. But in my initial carrier started as Research scientist with most reputed Group and largest Denim Manufacturer Arvind, Innovated several Technology and products. But R&D was not appreciated and I stopped working as scientist and started working in Manufacturing routine work. If you are looking for Textiles Innovations, I may discuss and contribute more Industry Friendly for producing Textiles at cheapest cost and also new application of various Medical parameters and fitness of each and every Human being while using most comfortable Garments at different work, activities. We may jointly start working in the same direction if there is any interest from ano one. Please contact me on +919227440907

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